Law School Innovation Program

In early 2023, Bloomberg Law will recognize selected law schools that have implemented innovative programs into their curricula that advance new methodologies and approaches to student instruction, legal technology implementation and usage, experiential learning, and other facets of legal education.

Mission

We want to identify, recognize, and connect law school faculty, staff, and administrators who are pioneering educational innovations that benefit their students, their schools, and the legal field. Through the Law School Innovation Program, we seek to acknowledge these innovators while raising overall awareness of innovation in legal education.

2022 Submissions

Law schools from across the country applied to Bloomberg Law’s inaugural Law School Innovation Program. Those schools, and their innovations, included:



Albany Law School, Access to Justice through Technology

Albany Law School, Innovation Intensive

Baylor University School of Law, Baylor Law Leadership Development Program

Brooklyn Law School, Brooklyn Law Incubator & Policy Clinic (BLIP Clinic)

California Western School of Law, Integrating the Stages of Reflection Model

Cleveland State University, Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, Teaching Technology to Lawyers and Law to Technologists

DePaul University College of Law, Interdisciplinary Legal Education/JD Certificate in Information Technology, Cybersecurity & Data Privacy

Drake University Law School, First Year Trial Practicum

Drexel University, Thomas R. Kline School of Law, The Privacy, Cybersecurity and Compliance Program

Emory University School of Law, TI:GER Program

Georgia State University College of Law, Legal Analytics & Innovation Initiative

Gonzaga University School of Law, The Center for Law, Ethics & Commerce

Harvard Law School, Start-up Entrepreneurship and Innovations in Legal Technology course

Louisiana State University Paul M. Hebert Law Center, Apprenticeship Week

Michigan State University College of Law, Center for Law, Technology & Innovation

North Carolina Central University School of Law, Professional Certification Support

North Carolina Central University School of Law, Student Attendance at Tech and Legal Tech Conferences

North Carolina Central University School of Law, The Law & Technology Certificate program

New York Law School, Enhancing Teaching and Learning in a Law School Through Application of Principles for Educational Research

Northeastern University School of Law, NuLawLab

Northern Illinois University College of Law, Business Law Innovation Clinic

Northern Illinois University College of Law, Using Online Resources to Improve Student Learning, Inside and Outside of the Classroom

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Innovation Lab

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Master of Science in Law (MSL)

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, National Appellate Clinic Network

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Northwestern Pritzker School of Law Center for Practice Engagement and Innovation

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, San Francisco Immersion Program

Northwestern Pritzker School of Law, Systematic Content Analysis of Litigation EventS (SCALES)

Pepperdine University, Caruso School of Law, Experiential Learning Program and Requirement

Roger Williams University School of Law, Race and the Foundations of American Law

Santa Clara University School of Law, Privacy Law Certificate 

Santa Clara University School of Law, Tech Edge JD Certificate

South Texas College of Law Houston, The Inter-School Negotiation Practicum

Southwestern Law School, “More than the Numbers”: Innovative Approach to Law School Admissions

St. Mary’s University School of Law, St. Mary’s School of Law Online J.D. Program

University of St Thomas School of Law (MN), Compliance Concentration

Suffolk University Law School, Suffolk University Law School Legal Innovation & Technology Certificate

Suffolk University Law School, Legal Innovation & Technology (LIT) JD Concentration

Suffolk University Law School, Legal Innovation & Technology Lab

Syracuse University College of Law, Innovation Law Center

Syracuse University College of Law, Orange Flex Program

Syracuse University College of Law, The National Trial League 

Touro University Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center, PechaKucha

University of Arizona, James E Rogers College of Law, Innovation for Justice

University of California Hastings College of the Law, Concentration in Technology and Innovation in the Practice of Law

University of California Hastings College of the Law, LexLab

University of California Hastings College of the Law, The Startup Legal Garage

University of Denver, Sturm College of Law, Law + Innovation Lab

University of Detroit Mercy School of Law, The Law Firm Program courses

University of Illinois College of Law, Course on Empirical Methods in Law

University of Minnesota Law School, Law in Practice

University of New Hampshire, Franklin Pierce School of Law, Hybrid JD Program

University of Oklahoma College of Law, OU Law Digital Initiative

University of Pittsburgh School of Law, Future Law Project

University of Richmond School of Law, Legal Business Design Hub

University of Tennessee College of Law, Institute for Professional Leadership

University of Utah, S.J. Quinney College of Law, Creative Advocacy Lab

University of Washington School of Law, Tech Policy Lab

University of Wisconsin Law School, Legal Technology Externship via Law & Entrepreneurship Clinic

Villanova University, Charles Widger School of Law, Professor Amy Emerson’s course, Leveraging Technology to Promote Access to Justice

Widener University Delaware Law School, Dignity Rights Clinic

Widener University Delaware Law School, Dignity Law Program

Criteria

Applications will be evaluated on four criteria, each equally weighted:

Innovation

The extent to which the innovation is a new approach to legal education. The level of originality the innovation provides as a teaching method, experiential learning program, implementation of new technology, or other new approaches to legal education.

Impact on Students

The impact the innovation has on students, both during law school and beyond. For example, the metrics (qualitative or quantitative) you collect and how they demonstrate the impact the innovation has had on student learning and development.

Ability to Advance the Legal Industry

The extent to which the innovation serves to advance or improve the legal industry. The degree to which the innovation solves problems or addresses deficiencies in legal instruction, scholarship, or pedagogy – better preparing students for their careers.

Replicability

The extent to which the innovation can be scaled so that students at other schools can benefit. The degree to which an innovation’s tenets can be embraced at other law schools and benefit more students.

Meet Our Evaluators

The evaluators for the inaugural Law School Innovation Program include practicing attorneys, legal tech and legal operations professionals, in-house counsel, and Bloomberg Law experts who have worked with and alongside law firms, businesses, and academic and professional institutions.

Industry Experts


Bloomberg Law Experts


Submission Instructions and General Information:

To be eligible, applicants must be from a U.S. law school and innovations must not be commercial in nature or for-profit. Schools and individuals may submit multiple applications, but each innovation may have only one application associated with it. There are no fees associated with applying to this program.


Each application must include the following:

  • The applicant(s)’s name, academic institution, and contact information (email, phone number, and office address).
  • The name of the innovation.
  • Four 500-word responses that explain and highlight how the innovation meets the four evaluation criteria (i.e., one 500-word response each on innovation, impact on students, ability to advance legal industry, and replicability).
  • Note: word count will be strictly observed for each response.

The following supplemental materials may be included with each application, but are not required:

  • A supplemental video no longer than five minutes that highlights the innovation.
  • Up to 10 supplemental written materials that are used in or about the innovation (e.g., a course syllabus, course materials, student testimonials). Please see the FAQ page for more information on supplemental material submissions.

Applications are closed for this year’s program. Finalists will be announced in early 2023.

Top