Family-Related Leave – New Child Bonding (Birth, Adoption, Foster Care)

Data current as of April 2021.

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The map highlights show states with New Child Bonding Leave Laws in place. Scroll down to see the state’s full policy.

Leave Laws by State

Arkansas

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: All employers and employees.

Reasons for leave: If maternity or paternity leave is permitted for biological parents after the birth of their child, this leave must be permitted for adoptive parents when an adopted child is placed in their home. However, this requirement doesn’t apply to an adoption by a custodial parent’s spouse, of a person over age 18, or of a foster child by the child’s foster parents.

Leave amount: Unspecified. Requests for additional leave due to the placement of an adopted child who is ill or has a disability must be considered on the same basis as comparable requests due to childbirth complications.

Paid or unpaid: Employer-provided benefits, such as pay guarantees, must be equally available to biological and adoptive parents.

Ark. Code Ann. § 9-9-105

For more information, see Arkansas Family and Medical Leave.

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California

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers that directly employ five or more employees in the United States to work for wages or a salary. Employees who have been employed by their employer for at least 12 months and have worked at least 1,250 hours for the employer in the past 12 months.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family care and medical leave law, including to bond with their child after birth and the placement of a child with them for adoption or foster care.

Leave amount: Up to 12 workweeks annually.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid, but substitution of vacation, sick leave, or other paid leave is permitted.

Cal. Gov’t Code § 12945.2

Cal. Code Regs. tit. 2, §§ 11087 to 11088, 11090 to 11093

For more information, see California Family and Medical Leave.

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Colorado

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: All employers and employees.

Reasons for leave: If maternity or paternity leave is offered to employees following the birth of their child, it must be offered to employees who are adopting a child.

Leave amount: The minimum leave period for adoptive parents must be equal to the leave period for biological parents. Additional leave for the adoption of a child who is ill or has a disability must be considered on the same basis as comparable leave requests for childbirth-related complications.

Paid or unpaid: Any employer-provided pay, job guarantee, or other benefit must be equally available to employees who are adoptive or biological parents.

Colo. Rev. Stat. § 19-5-211

For more information, see Colorado Family and Medical Leave.

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Connecticut

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 75 or more employees working in Connecticut. Employees who have been employed by their employer for at least 12 months and have worked for the employer for at least 1,000 hours in the past 12 months. If applicable, they must have been recalled or otherwise re-employed after a layoff or other interruption of the employment relationship.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family and medical leave law, including the birth of their child or the placement of a child with them for adoption or foster care.

Leave amount: Up to 16 workweeks in a 24-month period.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid, but substitution of paid vacation, personal, or family leave is permitted.

Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 31-51kk to 31-51ll, 31-51nn

Conn. Agencies Regs. §§ 31-51qq-2, 31-51qq-6 to 31-51qq-8, 31-51qq-10 to 31-51qq-40

For more information, see Connecticut Family and Medical Leave.

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District of Columbia

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 20 or more employees on their payroll during 20 or more calendar workweeks in the current or preceding calendar year. Employees who have been employed by their employer for at least one year without any break in service, except for regular holiday, sick, or personal leave. Employees who have worked for their employer for at least 1,000 hours in the past 12 months. (Employees who are re-employed after military service in the National Guard or Reserves must be credited with the hours they would have worked, if not for their service, in calculating the 1,000-hour requirement.)

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family and medical leave law, including family leave for the birth of their child, the adoption of a child, or the placement of a child with them for foster care or when they are assuming permanent parental responsibility of the child.

Leave amount: Up to 16 workweeks of family leave over a 24-month period.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid, but substitution of paid family, vacation, personal, or compensatory leave is permitted.

D.C. Code §§ 32-501, 32-502, 32-516, 32-503, 32-505, 32-513

D.C. Mun. Regs. tit. 4, §§ 1600 to 1607, 1609, 1616, 1699, 603

For more information, see District of Columbia Family and Medical Leave.

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Hawaii

Hawaii doesn’t have a law that applies generally to private employers regarding leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 100 or more employees for each workday during each of 20 or more calendar weeks in the current or preceding calendar year. Paid employees who have worked for their employer for at least six consecutive months.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family leave law, including the birth of their child or the adoption of a child.

Leave amount: Up to four weeks annually. If employees accrue paid sick leave, they must be allowed to use up to 10 days of the leave annually for family leave purposes.

Paid or unpaid: Paid, unpaid, or both. Substitution of paid vacation, personal, family, or other leave is permitted.

Haw. Rev. Stat. §§ 398-1 to 398-2, 398-3 to 398-4, 398-10

Haw. Code R. §§ 12-27-1, 12-27-4 to 12-27-5, 12-27-6 to 12-27-7, 12-27-8, 12-27-9

For more information, see Hawaii Family and Medical Leave.

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Kentucky

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: All employers and employees.

Reasons for leave: The placement of a child under age 7 with them for adoption.

Leave amount: Up to six weeks of personal leave.

Paid or unpaid: Unspecified.

Ky. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 337.010, 337.015

For more information, see Kentucky Family and Medical Leave.

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Maine

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 15 or more employees at one location in Maine. Employees who have been employed by their employer for at least 12 consecutive months, unless they work at a permanent worksite with fewer than 15 employees.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family medical leave law, including the birth of their child or their domestic partner’s child and the placement of a child (age 16 or younger) with them or their domestic partner for adoption.

Leave amount: Up to 10 workweeks in a two-year period.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid.

Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 26, §§ 843 to 846

For more information, see Maine Family and Medical Leave.

Coverage: Employers, as defined in Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 26, § 1043(9), that employ more than 10 covered employees during the usual, regular course of business for more than 120 calendar days in a calendar year. Employees who are engaged in employment, as defined in Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 26, § 1043(11)), excluding certain seasonal workers and certain employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

Reasons for leave: Employees can earn and use leave under the earned paid leave law, which doesn’t require them to specify a reason for using the leave.

Leave amount: One hour accrues for every 40 hours worked, capped at 40 hours annually. Use is capped at 40 hours annually.

Paid or unpaid: Paid at a rate equal to or greater than an employee’s base pay rate immediately prior to taking leave.

Me. Rev. Stat. Ann. tit. 26, § 637

12-170-18 Me. Code R. §§ I to V

For more information, see Maine Earned Paid Leave.

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Maryland

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 15 to 49 employees in Maryland for each workday in each of 20 or more calendar workweeks in the current or preceding calendar year. Employees who have worked for their employer for at least a 12-month period and at least 1,250 hours during the past 12 months, unless their employer has fewer than 15 employees at their worksite and fewer than 15 employees total within 75 miles of that worksite.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the parental leave law, including the birth of their child and the placement of a child with them for adoption or foster care.

Leave amount: Up to six workweeks annually. Leave can be denied if necessary to prevent substantial, grievous economic harm to operations.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid, but substitution of paid leave is permitted.

Md. Code Ann., Lab. & Empl. §§ 3-1201 to 3-1202, 3-1205, 3-1210, 3-1211

For more information, see Maryland Family and Medical Leave.

Coverage: Employers that do business in Maryland. All employees.

Reasons for leave: Adoption.

Leave amount: If an employer provides paid leave to employees after the birth of their child, the employer must provide paid leave to employees when a child is placed with them for adoption.
Paid or unpaid: Paid.

Md. Code Ann., Lab. & Empl. § 3-801

For more information, see Maryland Family and Medical Leave.

Coverage: All employers. Employees, excluding those who regularly work fewer than 12 hours per week for their employer, work under a contract of hire that isn’t covered employment under Md. Code Ann., Lab. & Empl. § 8-205, aren’t covered employees under Md. Code Ann., Lab. & Empl. § 9-222, or are under age 18 before the beginning of the benefit year and certain employees employed by a temporary services agency or employment agency or covered by a collective bargaining agreement.

Reasons for leave: Employees can earn and use leave for permitted reasons under the earned sick and safe leave law, including maternity or paternity leave.

Leave amount: At least one hour accrues for every 30 hours worked, capped at 40 hours annually and 64 hours at any time. Use is capped at 64 hours annually. Accrual isn’t required during a two-week pay period where an employee works fewer than 24 hours, a one-week pay period where an employee works fewer than 24 hours in the current and previous pay periods combined, or a pay period where an employee works fewer than 26 hours total if the employee is paid twice monthly. Alternatively, employees can be provided with their annual accrual amount at the beginning of each year.

Paid or unpaid: Paid at an employee’s normal wage rate. Unpaid if an employer has fewer than 15 employees.

Md. Code Ann., Lab. & Empl. §§ 3-1301 to 3-1302, 3-1303 to 3-1305

For more information, see Maryland Earned Paid Leave.

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Massachusetts

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers that are an “employer” under Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 151B, § 1(5). Employees who have completed an initial probationary period of up to three months or, if there is no such period, those who have worked for their employer full-time for at least three consecutive months.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the parental leave law, including childbirth, the placement of a child with them for adoption if the child is under age 18, or the placement of a child with them for adoption if the child is under age 23 and has a mental or physical disability.

Leave amount: Up to eight weeks.

Paid or unpaid: Paid or unpaid, at employers’ discretion.

Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 149, § 105D

For more information, see Massachusetts Family and Medical Leave.

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Minnesota

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 21 or more employees at one or more worksites. Employees who have worked for their employer for at least the past 12 months and an average number of hours per week equal to half a full-time equivalent position in their job classification during the past 12 months.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the parenting leave law, including the birth of their child and their adoption of a child who is under age 18 or is under age 20 but still attending secondary school.

Leave amount: Up to 12 weeks.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid.

Minn. Stat. §§ 181.940 to 181.941, 181.943

For more information, see Minnesota Family and Medical Leave.

Coverage: All employers.

Reasons for leave: If employers provide maternity or paternity leave to biological parents, they must allow adoptive parents to take leave to arrange for their adopted child’s placement or to care for the child after placement with them.

Leave amount: At least four weeks. However, if an established policy provides less than four weeks of maternity or paternity leave to biological parents, that period of leave must be the minimum period of leave for adoptive parents.

Paid or unpaid: Paid or unpaid.

Minn. Stat. § 181.92

For more information, see Minnesota Family and Medical Leave.

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Nebraska

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: All employers.

Reasons for leave: If biological parents are allowed to take leave after the birth of their child, adoptive parents must be allowed to take leave under the same terms when a child is placed with them for adoption. This requirement doesn’t apply if the adopted child is over age eight and doesn’t have special needs, is over age 18 and has special needs, is a stepchild adopted by a stepparent, is a foster child adopted by a foster parent, or was originally under a voluntary placement for purposes other than adoption without assistance from an attorney, physician, or other person or agency and the placement later resulted in a petition for the child’s adoption by the person with whom the placement was made.

Leave amount: Unspecified.

Paid or unpaid: Unspecified.

Neb. Rev. Stat. § 48-234

For more information, see Nebraska Family and Medical Leave.

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Nevada

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 50 or more employees working in Nevada, excluding new employers during their first two years of operating. Employees, excluding temporary, seasonal, or on-call employees.

Reasons for leave: Employees can earn and use leave under the paid leave law without providing a reason for such use.

Leave amount: At least 0.01923 hour accrues for each hour worked. Alternatively, employees can be provided with the total amount they are entitled to accrue in a benefit year on the first day of the year. Use is capped at 40 hours annually.

Paid or unpaid: Paid at the pay rate an employee was compensated at when leave was taken.

Nev. Rev. Stat. § 608.0197

For more information, see Nevada Earned Paid Leave.

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New Jersey

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers in New Jersey with 30 or more employees for each workday during each of 20 or more calendar workweeks in the current or immediately preceding calendar year. Employees who have worked for their employer for compensation for at least 12 months and at least 1,000 base hours during the past 12 months. If they are laid off or furloughed due to a state of emergency, up to 90 calendar days of the layoff or furlough period counts as time worked and their weekly base hours during that period are the same as their average number of hours worked per week during the rest of the past 12 months.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family leave law, including to provide care in connection with the birth of their child, including a child born pursuant to a valid written agreement between an employee and a gestational carrier, and the placement of a child with them for adoption or foster care.

Leave amount: Up to 12 weeks in a 24-month period. Leave can be denied for a salaried employee whose base salary ranks among the highest-paid 5% of employees or seven highest-paid employees in an employer’s overall workforce, whichever group is bigger, if it would cause substantial, grievous economic harm to operations.

Paid or unpaid: Paid, unpaid, or both. Substitution of paid leave is permitted for unpaid family leave.

N.J. Stat. Ann. §§ 34:11B-3 to 34:11B-5, 34:11B-8, 34:11B-13 to 34:11B-14

N.J. Admin. Code §§ 13:8-2.1 to 13:8-2.2, 13:14-1.2 to 13:14-1.3, 13:14-1.4 to 13:14-1.9, 13:14-1.12 to 13:14-1.13

For more information, see New Jersey Family and Medical Leave.

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New York

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: All employers and employees.

Reasons for leave: Adoption of a child.

Leave amount: If employees are allowed to take leave after the birth of their child, they must be allowed to take the same leave under the same terms after the adoption of a child. This requirement doesn’t apply if the child has reached the minimum age for attending public school without paying tuition(as established in N.Y. Educ. Law § 3202(1)), unless the child is a hard-to-place or handicapped child under age 18 (as defined in N.Y. Soc. Serv. Law § 451).

Paid or unpaid: Unspecified.

N.Y. Labor Law §§ 2, 201-C

For more information, see New York Family and Medical Leave.

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Oregon

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers that engage or use the personal service of one or more employees in Oregon, reserve the right to control how the service is performed, and employ 25 or more workers in the state for each workday during each of 20 or more calendar workweeks in the current or immediately preceding year. Employees who have been employed by their employer for at least the past 180 calendar days, have worked for the employer for at least 25 hours per week on average during that period, and are employed in Oregon, excluding those employed by their parent, spouse, or child.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family leave law, including any of the following reasons: The birth of their child. To care for their newborn child. To care for a newly adopted or newly placed foster child who is under age 18 or is age 18 or older but incapable of self-care because of a physical or mental impairment, including time spent on the legal process of adoption or foster placement.

Leave amount: Up to 12 weeks annually.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid, but substitution of paid sick, vacation, or other leave is permitted.

Or. Rev. Stat. §§ 659A.001, 659A.150, 659A.153, 659A.156, 659A.159, 659A.162, 659A.168, 659A.171, 659A.174, 659A.186

Or. Admin. R. 839-009-0210 to 839-009-0250, 839-009-0320

For more information, see Oregon Family and Medical Leave.

Coverage: Employers with one or more employees working in Oregon. Employees who provide personal services at a fixed rate to an employer that pays for, agrees to pay for, or permits the performance of the services, excluding those who receive paid sick leave under federal law, participants in certain work training programs, certain employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement, and those employed by their parent, spouse, or child.

Reasons for leave: Employees can earn and use leave for permitted reasons under the sick time law, including any of the following reasons: The birth of their child. To care for their newborn child. To care for a newly adopted or newly placed foster child who is under age 18 or is age 18 or older but incapable of self-care because of a physical or mental impairment, including time spent on the legal process of adoption or foster placement.

Leave amount: At least one hour accrues for every 30 hours worked or 1-1/3 hours accrues for every 40 hours worked, capped at 40 hours annually and 80 hours total. Use is capped at 40 hours annually. Alternatively, employees can be provided with at least 40 hours at the beginning of each year.

Paid or unpaid: Paid at an employee’s regular pay rate or the applicable statutory minimum wage rate, whichever is greater. Unpaid for an employer with fewer than 10 employees working in Oregon, unless the employer has at least six employees working in the state and is located in an Oregon city with a population exceeding 500,000.

Or. Rev. Stat. §§ 653.601, 653.606, 653.611, 653.616, 653.621, 653.636, 653.646

Or. Admin. R. 839-007-0000 to 839-007-0005, 839-007-0007, 839-007-0015, 839-007-0020, 839-007-0025, 839-007-0030 to 839-007-0032, 839-007-0045, 839-007-0060

For more information, see Oregon Earned Paid Leave.

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Pennsylvania

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers and employees covered by the state’s fair employment practices law (see “Coverage” in Pennsylvania Equal Employment Opportunity).

Reasons for leave: If employers have a policy or practice that allows employees to take leave for child-rearing and child-care purposes, the leave must apply equally to male and female employees. Child includes a child by birth or adoption.

Leave amount: Unspecified.

Paid or unpaid: Unspecified. Leave for child-rearing purposes can’t include payment of sickness or disability benefits.

16 Pa. Code §§ 41.101, 41.104

For more information, see Pennsylvania Family and Medical Leave.

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Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico doesn’t have a law that applies generally to private employers regarding leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: All employers. Female employees who receive a salary, wages, day wages, or other compensation, including those who are on vacation, sick leave, or other leave authorized by law if their employment relationship remains in effect.

Reasons for leave: Maternity leave to adopt a preschool-aged child or a child age 6 or older. A preschool-aged child is a child up to age 5 who isn’t registered in school under Puerto Rico legislation and legal procedures.

Leave amount: Employees who adopt a preschool-aged child are entitled to the same maternity leave benefits as those who give birth to a child. Employees who adopt a child age 6 or older are entitled to up to five weeks of maternity leave.

Paid or unpaid: Paid, at an employee’s normal rate of compensation.

P.R. Laws Ann. tit. 29, §§ 467 (2020 P.R. Laws 95 (P.C. 2424)), 471, 473

For more information, see Puerto Rico Family and Medical Leave.

Coverage: Employers that employ or allow anyone to work for compensation. Employees who work at least 130 hours per month, excluding those who are exempt from the federal Fair Labor Standards Act and those covered by a collective agreement. (Use of sick or vacation leave counts as time worked.)

Reasons for leave: Employees can earn and use leave under the vacation and sick leave law for personal use.

Leave amount: For an employer with up to 12 employees, at least half a day of vacation leave accrues monthly. For an employer with more than 12 employees, vacation leave accrues monthly at the following rates: At least half a day during the first year of service, three-quarters of a day during the second through fifth years of service, one day during the sixth through 15th years of service, and 1.25 days after 15 years of service. Vacation leave accrual is capped at the amount accrued over two years. At least one day of sick leave accrues monthly. (If employees were entitled by law to higher accrual rates while working for an employer before Jan. 26, 2017, those rates must continue for them as long as they work for that employer.)

Paid or unpaid: Leave must be paid based on the regular workday when it is used, in an amount that is an employee’s regular hourly wage earned in the month the leave was accrued or the legal minimum wage, whichever is greater. Employees can liquidate accrued vacation leave in excess of 10 days.

P.R. Laws Ann. tit. 29, §§ 185h (2017 P.R. Laws 4 (H.B. 453)), 250a to 250d (2015 P.R. Laws 251 (H.B. 695); 2017 P.R. Laws 4 (H.B. 453); 2018 P.R. Laws 60 (H.B. 96); 2020 P.R. Laws 37 (P.C. 2428)), 250f (2017 P.R. Laws 4 (H.B. 453))

For more information, see Puerto Rico Earned Paid Leave.

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Rhode Island

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers with 50 or more covered employees. Full-time employees who have worked for their employer for 12 consecutive months, averaging at least 30 hours per week.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the parental and family leave law, including parental leave for the birth of their child or the placement of a child (up to age 16) with them for adoption. If employees are allowed to use sick leave after the birth of their child, they must be allowed to use this leave for the placement of a child(up to age 16) with them for adoption.

Leave amount: Up to 13 consecutive workweeks of parental or family leave in any two calendar years.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid.

R.I. Gen. Laws §§ 28-48-1, 28-48-2, 28-48-4, 28-48-11

260-30 R.I. Code R. §§ 05-7.3, 05-7.4

For more information, see Rhode Island Family and Medical Leave.

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Tennessee

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers covered by the state’s fair employment practices law (see “Coverage” in Tennessee Equal Employment Opportunity) if they have at least 100 full-time employees, excluding temporary employees, at the affected worksite. Employees covered by the state’s fair employment practices law if they have been employed by their employer for at least 12 consecutive months as full-time employees.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family and medical leave law, including adoption.

Leave amount: Up to four months. For adoption, the four-month period starts when an employee receives custody of the child. Family and medical leave doesn’t affect employees’ right to receive vacation or sick leave that they were eligible for when the leave started. Interaction with other mandates: The family and medical leave provisions don’t affect any bargaining agreement or employer policy that provides greater or additional benefits than what is required under the provisions.

Paid or unpaid: Paid or unpaid, at employers’ discretion.

Tenn. Code Ann. § 4-21-408

For more information, see Tennessee Family and Medical Leave.

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Vermont

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers doing business or operating in Vermont if they have 10 or more employees who are employed for an average of at least 30 hours per week during the year. Employees who have been continuously employed by their employer for an average of at least 30 hours per week for one year, excluding those who have given or received notice of their employment terminating.

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the parental and family leave law, including parental leave for the birth of their child or the initial placement of a child (age 16 or younger) with them for adoption.

Leave amount: Up to 12 weeks of parental and family leave annually.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid, but up to six weeks of vacation, sick leave, or other paid leave can be substituted.

Vt. Stat. Ann. tit. 21, §§ 471 to 472a

For more information, see Vermont Family and Medical Leave.

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Washington

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: All employers and employees.

Reasons for leave: If an employer provides leave to biological parents to care for a newborn child, the employer must provide the same leave under the same terms to adoptive parents or stepparents when a child under age six is initially placed with them for adoption and to stepparents when a child is born.

Leave amount: Unspecified. Leave can be denied to stepparents who don’t live with the child at the time of birth or initial placement for adoption.

Paid or unpaid: Unspecified.

Wash. Rev. Code § 49.12.360

For more information, see Washington Family and Medical Leave.

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Wisconsin

This topic covers leave to bond with a new child. Leave for pregnancy, childbirth, or related conditions is covered separately under Family-Related Leave (see Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Related Conditions).

Coverage: Employers that engage in any activity, enterprise, or business in Wisconsin and have employed at least 50 workers on a permanent basis in at least six of the past 12 calendar months. Employees who are employed in Wisconsin, have been employed by their employer for more than 52 consecutive weeks, and have worked for the employer for at least 1,000 hours during the past 52 weeks, except as provided in Wis. Stat. Ann. § 452.38 and excluding those employed by their parent, spouse, domestic partner, or child. (Absences due to leave or a layoff don’t count against the 52 consecutive weeks under certain conditions. Hours worked include hours for which they were paid under a regular policy of paid leave.)

Reasons for leave: Employees can take leave for permitted reasons under the family and medical leave law, including family leave for the birth of their child or the placement of a child with them for adoption or as a precondition to adoption under Wis. Stat. Ann. § 48.90(2).

Leave amount: Up to six weeks of family leave annually for the birth of their child, but no more than eight weeks of combined family leave annually. Up to six weeks of family leave annually for the placement of a child with them for adoption or as a precondition to adoption, but no more than eight weeks of combined family leave annually. No more than one six-week period of leave can be used for the birth or adoption of any one child.

Paid or unpaid: Unpaid, but substitution of any employer-provided paid leave is permitted.

Wis. Stat. Ann. § 103.10

Wis. Admin. Code DWD §§ 225.01 to 225.02, 225.03 to 225.04, 225.031

For more information, see Wisconsin Family and Medical Leave.

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